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Water: Wetlands

Bird Conservation Overview


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By working to safeguard the natural environment — air, water, and land — EPA is an important partner in efforts to conserve birds. Through activities such as wetlands protection, coastal management, protection of aquatic resources, regulation of pesticides, and international leadership in environmental protection, EPA programs contribute to bird conservation. EPA also participates in several public/private bird conservation partnerships to help strengthen the ties between these efforts and EPA programs, and to contribute EPA's support and technical assistance to these bird conservation initiatives.

External Link Disclaimer

This page provides links to non-EPA web sites that provide additional information about this topic. You will leave the EPA.gov domain, and EPA cannot attest to the accuracy of information on that non-EPA page. Providing links to a non-EPA Web site is not an endorsement of the other site or the information it contains by EPA or any of its employees. Also, be aware that the privacy protection provided on the EPA.gov domain (see Privacy and Security Notice) may not be available at the external link. Exit EPA Disclaimer

Although wildlife management is not a central part of EPA's mission, numerous Agency programs and initiatives support and complement efforts to conserve fish and wildlife and their habitats.  Healthy populations of fish and wildlife are an integral component of healthy ecosystems.  They also contribute directly to our quality of life by providing recreational opportunities, and generate economic benefits by supporting hunting, fishing, bird watching, photography, tourism, and other outdoor activities.

Birds are an important — and highly visible — part of the ecosystem.  Bird watching is one of the fastest growing recreational activities in the United States, generating sizable economic benefits1.  An estimated 63 million Americans feed birds at home, and more than 24 million travel to watch birds.  Bird watchers spent $5.2 billion in 1991 on associated goods and services, supporting almost 200,000 jobs.  Birds are important ecologically as well as economically.  They are vital links in many food webs, and often serve as biological indicators of overall ecosystem health.  In addition to these tangible benefits, healthy populations of birds enhance the quality of outdoor recreation — and overall quality of life — for countless Americans.

By working to safeguard the natural environment — air, water, and land — EPA is an important partner in efforts to conserve birds.  Through activities such as wetlands protection, coastal management, protection of aquatic resources, regulation of pesticides, and international leadership in environmental protection, EPA programs contribute to bird conservation.  EPA also participates in several public/private bird conservation partnerships to help strengthen the ties between these efforts and EPA programs, and to contribute EPA's support and technical assistance to these bird conservation initiatives.

This web site has been developed to provide an overview of bird conservation including descriptions of the major North American bird conservation initiatives, actions EPA is taking in its own programs to further bird conservation, actions that citizens can take to conserve birds, and other background information, including many useful links to other web sites.


Footnote

  1. Statistics from Bird Conservation, Spring 1997.  A publication of Partners in Flight, exit EPA produced by American Bird Conservancy with support from the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation.

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