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Water: Wetlands

MEMORANDUM: Individual Permit Flexibility for Small Landowners

In order to clearly affirm the flexibility afforded to small landowners under Section 404 of the Clean Water Act, this policy clarifies that for discharges of dredged or fill material affecting up to two acres of non-tidal wetlands for the construction or expansion of a home or farm building, or expansion of a small business, it is presumed that alternatives located on property not currently owned by the applicant are not practicable under the Section 404(b)(1) Guidelines.

Specifically, for those activities involving discharges of dredged or fill material affecting up to two acres into jurisdictional wetlands for:

  1. the construction or expansion of a single family home and attendant features, such as a driveway, garage, storage shed, or septic field;
  2. the construction or expansion of a barn or other farm building; or
  3. the expansion of a small business facility;

which are not otherwise covered by a general permit, it is presumed that alternatives located on property not currently owned by the applicant are not practicable under the Section 404(b)(1) Guidelines. The Guidelines' requirements to appropriately and practicably minimize and compensate for any adverse environmental impacts of such activities remain.

Discussion

The Clean Water Act Section 404 regulatory program provides that the Army Corps of Engineers evaluate permit applications for the discharge of dredged or fill material into waters of the U.S., including wetlands, in accordance with regulatory requirements of the Section 404(b)(1) Guidelines (Guidelines). The Guidelines are the substantive environmental criteria used in evaluating discharges of dredged or fill material.

The Section 404(b)(1) Guidelines establish a mitigation sequence that provides a sound framework to ensure that the environmental impacts of permitted actions are acceptable. Under this framework, there is a three-step sequence for mitigating potential adverse impacts to the aquatic environment associated with a proposed discharge -- first avoidance, then minimization, and lastly compensation for unavoidable impacts to aquatic resources.

The Guidelines' mitigation sequence is designed to establish a consistent approach to be used in ensuring that all practicable measures have been taken to reduce potential adverse impacts associated with proposed projects in wetlands and other aquatic systems. The Guidelines define the term "practicable" as "available and capable of being done [by the applicant] after taking into consideration cost, existing technology, and logistics in light of overall project purposes." (40 CFR 230.3(q)). The first step in the sequence requires the evaluation of potential alternative sites under 230.10(a) of the Guidelines, to locate the proposed project so that aquatic impacts are avoided to the extent practicable.

This policy statement clarifies that, for the purposes of the alternatives analysis, it is presumed that practicable alternatives are limited to property owned by the permit applicant in circumstances involving certain small projects affecting less than two acres of non-tidal wetlands. This presumption is consistent with the practicability considerations required under the Guidelines and reflects the nature of the projects to which the presumption applies -- specifically, the construction or expansion of a single family home and attendant features, the construction or expansion of a barn or other farm building, or the expansion of a business. For such small projects that would solely expand an existing structure, the basic project purpose is so tied to the existing structures owned by the applicant, that it would be highly unusual that the project could be practicably located on other sites not owned by the applicant. In these cases, such as construction of driveways, garages, or storage sheds, or with home and barn additions, proximity to the existing structure is typically a fundamental aspect of the project purpose.

In the evaluation of potential practicable alternatives, the Guidelines do not exclude the consideration of sites that, while not currently owned by the permit applicant, could reasonably be obtained to satisfy the project purpose. However, it is the experience of the Army Corps of Engineers and EPA that areas not currently owned by the applicant have, in the great majority of circumstances, not been determined to be practicable alternatives in cases involving the small landowner activities described above. Cost, availability, and logistical and capability considerations inherent in the determination of practicability under the Guidelines have been the basis for this conclusion by the agencies.

The agencies recognize that the presumption characterized in this policy statement may be rebutted in certain circumstances. For example, a more thorough review of practicable alternatives would be warranted for individual sites comprising a subdivision of homes, if following issuance of this policy statement, a real estate developer subdivided a large, contiguous wetlands parcel into numerous parcels. In addition, the presumption is applicable to the expansion of existing small business facilities. Small businesses are typically confined to only one location and with economic and logistical limitations that generally preclude the availability of practicable alternative locations to meet their expansion needs. Conversely, larger businesses with multiple locations and greater resources are expected to consider opportunities to practicably avoid adverse aquatic impacts by evaluating off-site alternatives.

Finally, it is important to note that this presumption of practicable alternatives is intended to apply to the individual permit process. Alternatives are not evaluated for activities covered by general permits. Many activities related to the construction or expansion of a home, farm, or business, are already covered by a general permit. In addition, in conjunction with the issuance of this policy statement, a nationwide general permit authorizing discharges related to single family residential development is being proposed and will be available for public comment.

If you have any questions regarding this memorandum, please contact Gregory Peck of EPA's Wetlands Division at (202) 260-8794 or Michael Davis of the Corps of Engineer's Regulatory Branch at (202) 272-0199.

Robert Perciasepe

Assistant Administrator for Water

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

John Zirschky

Acting Assistant Secretary

of the Army (Civil Works)




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