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Water: Water Headlines

Water Headlines

Water Headlines is a weekly publication that announces publications, policies, and activities of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Water.

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Water Headlines for the Week of August 28, 2014 

1) EPA Finalizes Sufficiently Sensitive Test Methods for NPDES Permit Applications and Reporting
2) Webcast on September 3 on Green Infrastructure and Smart Growth
3) NEEF Launches Algal Bloom Photo Contest
4) FHA's Environmental Excellence Awards Program Accepting Nominations 
5) Section 319 Success Story: Wildhorse Creek, Oklahoma


1) EPA Finalizes Sufficiently Sensitive Test Methods for NPDES Permit Applications and Reporting
EPA finalized minor amendments to its Clean Water Act regulations to require "sufficiently sensitive" analytical test methods under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES). The rulemaking clarifies that NPDES applicants and permittees must use EPA-approved analytical methods capable of detecting and measuring pollutants at or below applicable water quality criteria or permit limits. This first rule is based on Clean Water Act requirements and clarifies existing EPA regulations. The amendments in this rulemaking affect only chemical-specific methods; they do not apply to Whole Effluent Toxicity methods or their use. For more information, go to: http://water.epa.gov/polywaste/npdes/basics/index.cfm

2) Webcast on September 3 on Green Infrastructure and Smart Growth
Join us on September from 1-2:30pm EDT for a webcast on green infrastructure and smart growth. Learn about communities that are successfully leveraging green infrastructure as part of broader planning and community development initiatives. Practitioners will discuss land-use strategies for clean water, including green streets, local code review, and stormwater baking. This webinar is part of the EPA Green Infrastructure Program's 2014 Webcast Series, and qualifies for 1.5 certification maintenance credits from the American Planning Association. Register at https://www1.gotomeeting.com/register/829823872

3) NEEF Launches Algal Bloom Photo Contest
The National Environmental Education Foundation would like help documenting algal blooms in the nation's waters. Algal blooms can occur in water bodies as small as a neighborhood pond and as big as the Gulf of Mexico. When algae grow out of control in our waters, the result can be unappealing, harmful to our health and harmful to the environment. Submit photos of algal blooms for a chance to win great prizes! For more information and official contest rules, please visit: http://neefusa.org/algalbloomcontest
4) FHA's Environmental Excellence Awards Program Accepting Nominations
The Federal Highway Administration's Environmental Excellence Awards Program is now accepting nominations to honor partners, projects, and processes that excel in meeting growing transportation needs while protecting and enhancing the environment. Nominations will be accepted for any project, process, group or individual that used FHWA funding to make an outstanding contribution to transportation and the environment. Any organization, agency, group or individual in the public, private or non-profit sectors can submit a nomination. This year's program features 17 categories addressing the natural environment, human environment, and organization and process innovation. Several categories may relate to stormwater: Wetlands, Watersheds and Water Quality: Climate Change Adaptation and Resilience; Collaboration and Partnership; Ecosystems, Habitat and Wildlife; Educational and Training Programs; Environmental Leadership; Environmental Research; Environmental Streamlining; Innovative Use of Technology; and Roadside Resource Management and Maintenance. All entries are due by Sept. 30, 2014. For more information go to http://www.environment.fhwa.gov/eeawards
5) Section 319 Success Story: Wildhorse Creek, Oklahoma
Waterbody Improved: high turbidity, due in part to practices associatedf with cattle production, resulted in impairment in Wildhorse Creek and placement on Oklahoma's Clean Water Act (CWA) section 303(d) list of impaired waters in 2008. Implementation of best management practices to promote better quality grazing land and cropland decreased sediment loading into the creek. As a result, an 11-mile-long segment of Wildhorse Creek was removed from Oklahoma's list for turbidity impairment. This segment of Wildhorse Creek is now in full attainment of its fish and wildlife propagation designated use. The complete success story can be found at: http://water.epa.gov/polywaste/nps/success319/ok_wild.cfm


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