Jump to main content or area navigation.

Contact Us

Water: Water Headlines

June 18, 2013

1) EPA Report Details How Development Can Impact Public Health, Environment
2) EPA Sponsoring Webcast Series to Raise Awareness about Harmful Algal Blooms and Nutrient Pollution
3) EPA Makes Available Information Collection Request for List of Chemicals for Endocrine Disruptor Screening
4) EPA Features Locally Led Efforts in Urban Water Restoration via Video Series Urban Waters Voices: Darryl Haddock
5) Blog Spotlight: King Tides and Sea Level Rise, Part 2


1) EPA Report Details How Development Can Impact Public Health, Environment
EPA has released its most comprehensive review to date on how the built environment - the way we build our cities and towns - directly affects our environment and public health. The publication, Our Built and Natural Environments: A Technical Review of the Interactions among Land Use, Transportation, and Environmental Quality, provides evidence that certain kinds of land use and transportation strategies -- where and how we build our communities -- can reduce the environmental and human health impacts of development. According to the report, environmental impacts linked to building and development patterns include at least 850,000 acres of lakes, reservoirs, and ponds and 50,000 miles of rivers, and streams that are thought to be impaired by stormwater runoff. For more information about the report and an upcoming webinar, visit: http://www.epa.gov/smartgrowth/built.htm

2) EPA Sponsoring Webcast Series to Raise Awareness about Harmful Algal Blooms and Nutrient Pollution
On June 25, 2013, EPA's Watershed Academy will sponsor a free webcast on harmful algal blooms (HABs) and their Impacts in freshwater and marine ecosystems,the first in a series of webinars about this worsening environmental problem and public health threat. Jennifer Graham with the United States Geological Survey and Quay Dortch with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration will start the series with an introduction to HABs, their causes, and their impacts, and EPA HAB expert Mario Sengco will moderate. This webcast series is a part of a broader outreach effort this summer that will aim to focus public attention on HABs, which can sicken people and pets, devastate aquatic ecosystems, and harm the economy. To register, visit www.epa.gov/watershedwebcasts

3) EPA Makes Available Information Collection Request for List of Chemicals for Endocrine Disruptor Screening
EPA has initiated a 30-day public review of the information collection request for collecting data for a list of chemicals that will be screened for their potential to interact with the endocrine systems of humans and wildlife. EPA has also made available the list of chemicals covered by the information collection request and related policies and procedures for collecting data. This is the first time that non-pesticide commercial chemicals will be identified for endocrine screening. This second list of chemicals for endocrine disruptor screening includes 109 chemicals; 20 of the commercial chemicals found in sources of drinking water are also on the Toxic Substances Control Act work plan chemicals list for further assessment. Visit EPA's endocrine disruptor screening program website for more information: http://www.epa.gov/endo/

4) EPA Features Locally Led Efforts in Urban Water Restoration via Video Series Urban Waters Voices: Darryl Haddock
EPA has released Urban Waters Voices, a series of 12 video interviews featuring locally led efforts to restore urban waters in communities across the United States. These videos feature local efforts and strategies to improve urban water quality while advancing local community priorities. This week's video spotlights Darryl Haddock, Environmental Education Director for the West Atlanta Watershed Alliance, describing some of the challenges faced by communities in the watersheds of Proctor, Sandy, and Utoy Creek (e.g. combined sewer overflows, water quality issues, and access to recreational opportunities) and how the organization is using their outdoor activity center to educate and engage residents about these challenges. Watch the video.

5) Blog Spotlight: King Tides and Sea Level Rise, Part 2
Nancy Stoner, acting Assistant Administrator for EPA's Office of Water, blogs about the highest tides of the year, also known as king tides, which can cause tidal flooding in coastal communities. Anyone can join in raising king tides awareness by taking photos for our State of the Environment Photo Project. Read Nancy's blog at http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2013/06/king-tides-and-sea-level-rise-part-2/

 


Jump to main content.