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Water: Water Headlines

March 26, 2013

1) Office of Water To Hold Twitter Chat on Streams and Wetlands
2) EPA Survey Finds More Than Half of the Nation's River and Stream Miles in Poor Condition
3) EPA National Water Program Publishes 2012 Highlights of Progress: Responses to Climate Change
4) EPA Releases Report on Green Infrastructure Operation and Maintenance Practices
5) Success Spotlight: Clear Creek in North Carolina


1) Office of Water To Hold Twitter Chat on Streams and Wetlands
On Thursday at 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time, EPA acting Assistant Administrator for Water Nancy Stoner will hold a live Twitter chat about the importance of streams and wetlands in the United States. Questions can be submitted before or during the chat through the EPA water Twitter account, https://twitter.com/EPAwater, or by using the hashtag #waterchat on Twitter, which we will use during the chat so participants can easily follow the conversation. To learn more about streams and wetlands, visit http://water.epa.gov/type/rsl/streams.cfm and http://water.epa.gov/type/wetlands/basic.cfm.

2) EPA Survey Finds More Than Half of the Nation's River and Stream Miles in Poor Condition
Today, EPA released the results of the first comprehensive survey looking at the health of thousands of stream and river miles across the country, finding that more than half - 55 percent - are in poor condition for aquatic life. The 2008-2009 National Rivers and Stream Assessment reflects the most recent data available, and is part of EPA's expanded effort to monitor waterways in the U.S. and gather scientific data on the condition of the Nation's water resources. To access the report, visit: http://www.epa.gov/aquaticsurveys

3) EPA National Water Program Publishes 2012 Highlights of Progress: Responses to Climate Change
EPA has released a 2012 Highlights of Progress report, which provides a summary of the major climate change-related accomplishments of EPA's national and regional water programs in 2012. This is the fourth climate change progress report for the National Water Program and the first progress report organized around the five long-term programmatic vision areas described in the National Water Program 2012 Strategy: Response to Climate Change, which are water infrastructure; watersheds and wetlands; coastal and ocean waters; water quality; and, working with Tribes. The National Water Program 2012 Strategy: Response to Climate Change released in December 2012 was an update to the initial climate change and water strategy from 2008. The 2012 Strategy describes long-term goals for the management of sustainable water resources for future generations in light of climate change and is intended to be a road map to guide programmatic planning. To learn more, visit: http://epa.gov/water/climatechange.

4) EPA Releases Report on Green Infrastructure Operation and Maintenance Practices
EPA is releasing a report that examines the operation and maintenance practices of several green infrastructure projects funded by the Clean Water State Revolving Fund under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act and identifies trends and common elements shared by the various projects. The report provides information to communities and operators on funding programs to help ensure that green infrastructure projects are operated and maintained to optimize long-term performance and effectiveness. To view a copy of the report, please visit: http://water.epa.gov/grants_funding/cwsrf/upload/Green-Infrastructure-OM-Report.pdf.

5) Success Spotlight: Clear Creek in North Carolina
EPA's Clean Water Act Section 319 Program provides funding for restoration of nonpoint source-impaired water bodies. This week's success spotlight shines on Clear Creek in North Carolina. Pesticides in agricultural runoff, among other sources of pollution, impaired fish and other aquatic communities in North Carolina's Clear Creek. As a result, in 2000 the North Carolina Division of Water Quality added 11.7 miles of the creek to the state's list of impaired waters. Watershed partners conducted planning, implemented education/outreach programs, and worked with landowners to install agricultural best management practices Such practices included stabilizing and restoring streams, adding a pasture watering system, and implementing pesticide spray reduction management measures. Water quality has since improved in a portion of Clear Creek, prompting the state to remove two segments (totaling 5.2 miles) from the impaired waters list since 2006. Click here for more information

 


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