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Water: Water Headlines

August 7, 2012

1) EPA Issues U.S.-Mexico Border Water Infrastructure Program Report
2) New Information About Harmful Algal Blooms Online
3) New Urban Waters Outreach Toolkit
4) Success Spotlight: Eagle and Joos Valley Creeks, Wisconsin


1) EPA Issues U.S.-Mexico Border Water Infrastructure Program Report
EPA has issued the U.S.-Mexico Border water infrastructure program's annual report for 2011. The report highlights the significant impacts that the program is having in border communities by providing first-time access to drinking and wastewater infrastructure, improving public health and the environment, and creating jobs. EPA's U.S.-Mexico Border water infrastructure program has worked collaboratively with its federal, state and local partners in the U.S. and Mexico to address the critical drinking water and wastewater infrastructure needs of border residents since 1997. Since then, EPA investments of $571 million in 97 projects have leveraged $1.1 billion in funding from other sources for projects with total construction costs of more than $1.7 billion. Seventy-eight projects have been completed, including 13 projects in fiscal year 2011. Many of these projects are providing first-time drinking and wastewater services to underserved communities. Click here for more information.

2) New Information About Harmful Algal Blooms Online
EPA has published a new web page on harmful algal blooms to help inform states, tribal and local governments, other federal agencies, and the public about key issues regarding cyanobacteria, or blue-green algae, blooms in recreational waters and drinking water. Harmful algal blooms cause fouling of beaches and shorelines, economic and aesthetic losses, taste and odor problems in drinking water, and direct risks to human, fish and animal health. The web page includes information on the causes of bloom occurrence, prevention and mitigation measures, adverse human health effects from exposure to cyanotoxins (toxins from blue-green algae), ecological effects, sampling and detection methods, policies and guidelines, past and ongoing research, and links to other sites with information on algal toxins in freshwater. Click here to visit the web page.

3) New Urban Waters Outreach Toolkit
EPA, through the Anacostia Watershed Outreach and Education Project, has released a comprehensive toolkit that EPA regional offices, watershed organizations and others who promote green business can use to encourage homeowners to install rain barrels to prevent contamination in their local rivers. The toolkit includes details on the development of social marketing outreach to local residents, lessons learned and a summary of project accomplishments. Appendices include communication scripts for weathercasters, a detailed list of project partners, partnerships, and photos and screenshots of the messages used. For more information contact Catherine King at king.catherine@epa.gov or Bryan Goodwin at goodwin.bryan@epa.gov. Click here for more information.

4) Success Spotlight: Eagle and Joos Valley Creeks, Wisconsin
EPA's Clean Water Act Section 319 Program provides funding for restoration of nonpoint source-impaired water bodies. This week's success spotlight shines on Eagle and Joos Valley Creeks, Wisconsin. Eagle Creek and Joos Valley Creek lie within the Waumandee Creek watershed in Buffalo County, along the western border of Wisconsin. Erosion from streambanks, pastures and wooded grazing lands contributed to excess sediment and degraded habitat in the watershed. As a result, over 15 miles of Eagle Creek and Joos Valley Creek were added to Wisconsin's 1998 list of impaired waters. Project partners implemented agricultural best management practices to limit soil erosion and the amount of nitrogen and phosphorus entering the waterway. Partners also stabilized streambanks and waterways to restore fisheries habitat. Water quality has since improved in Eagle and Joos Valley creeks and the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources removed both creeks from the state's list of impaired waters in 2012. Click here for more information.

 


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