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Training Course Descriptions

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The Watershed Academy offers several training courses that support watershed approaches and also publicizes watershed courses sponsored by others, including EPA's Office of Water, other federal agencies, and nongovernmental organizations. The watershed-related training courses sponsored by EPA's Watershed Academy and Office of Water are summarized below. To obtain the latest schedule and training information, go to the Watershed Academy Web site. The course schedule includes contact information for course registration. Many courses are free, but fees apply in some instances.

The information provided on this Web page does not constitute an endorsement by the EPA of any non-Federal entity, or its products, nor does it recommend for or against the purchase of specific training courses referred to on this Web page.


WATERSHED ACADEMY TRAINING COURSES

Watersheds 101: The Clean Water Act: A Key Tool for Watershed Protection
This 2-day course provides a fundamental understanding of each of the major programs in the federal Clean Water Act (CWA) including water quality standards, waterbody assessment and reporting under sections 305(b) and 303(d), Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs), the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit program, the section 319 nonpoint source program, section 404 regulation of placement of dredge and fill material in U.S. waters, and the State Revolving Loan Fund (SRF). Emphasis is placed on the linkages between and across CWA program elements. The goal of the course is to provide trainees with broad knowledge that will enable them to answer most of the basic questions about regulatory tools, funding mechanisms, and other key elements of the CWA, as well as enhance their ability to develop and implement holistic, integrated strategies for watershed protection and restoration. The format includes slideshow presentations, question and answer sessions, informal quizzes, and group exercises.

The Watershed Academy also offers an expanded version of this course entitled "The Clean Water Act and Other Tools for Watershed Protection." This 3-day version of the course includes the information mentioned above, along with information about other key federal statutes relevant to protection and restoration of the chemical, physical, and biological integrity of surface waters (e.g., the Safe Drinking Water Act, Farm Bill, Transportation Equity Act of 2005) and selected innovative state and local tools (such as land acquisition and economic incentives).

These courses are sponsored by EPA's Office of Wetlands, Oceans, and Watersheds, and are intended for watershed managers, staff, and program leaders from states, tribes, and territories; local governments; EPA regional and headquarters staff; watershed associations; and other interested watershed practitioners.

For more information, contact Bill Painter, USEPA (4503T), 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20460. Phone: (202) 566-1218; E-mail: William Painter (painter.william@epa.gov) or Watershed Academy (wacademy@epa.gov)

Watersheds 102: Office of Water "Statutes Courses"
This 4-day course covers the key elements of the federal Clean Water Act and Safe Drinking Water Act along with an overview of other statutes administered by EPA's Office of Water that deal with coastal and marine waters. The course emphasizes the similarities and differences among the various statutes and the EPA regulations that implement them.

For more information, contact Bill Painter, USEPA (4503T), 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20460. Phone: (202) 566-1218; E-mail: William Painter (painter.william@epa.gov) or Watershed Academy (wacademy@epa.gov)

Watersheds 103: TMDL Training for Practitioners
This 1-day course reviews the programmatic and technical components of developing a Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) under section 303(d) of the Clean Water Act (CWA). Section 303(d) requires that states, territories, and authorized tribes (hereafter referred to as "states") develop lists of waters that do not meet state water quality standards, even after the application of technology-based and other required controls. States must establish priority rankings for the waters on the list and develop TMDLs for the waters. A TMDL is a calculation of the maximum amount of a pollutant that a waterbody can contain and still meet water quality standards and an allocation of that amount to the pollutant's sources. This training provides critical information on how the technical basis for a TMDL can be developed. The TMDL information is presented through lectures and relevant case study examples tailored to regional needs.

This course is sponsored by EPA's Office of Wetlands, Oceans, and Watersheds. The course is intended for people who develop TMDLs, including technical water resources staff and watershed managers from states, tribes, and territories; local governments; EPA regional and headquarters staff; and other watershed practitioners.

For more information, contact Bill Painter, USEPA (4503T), 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20460. Phone: (202) 566-1218; E-mail: William Painter (painter.william@epa.gov) or Watershed Academy (wacademy@epa.gov)

Watersheds 104: The ABCs of TMDLs for Stakeholders
This 1-day course is designed for people who engage in the Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) listing, development, and scheduling process but are not directly responsible for developing TMDLs. The course materials will review the Clean Water Act, TMDL provisions, TMDL listing process, and TMDL development, and will discuss how interested individuals can become involved in the TMDL process.

EPA's Office of Wetlands, Oceans, and Watersheds sponsors this course, which is intended for stakeholder groups such as agricultural and environmental communities, local government officials, and others from the public and private sectors.

For more information, contact Anne Weinberg, USEPA (4503T), 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20460. Phone: (202) 566-1217; E-mail: Anne Weinberg (weinberg.anne@epa.gov)  or Watershed Academy (wacademy@epa.gov)

Watersheds 105: Watershed Management Tools Primer
This 1- or 2-day course introduces a number of tools that practitioners will find useful in watershed management. The format of the course lends itself well to customization for various audiences according to their special focus or particular interest. The tools explained include watershed assessment methods, modeling, risk assessment, issue prioritization, methods for targeting actions, strategic monitoring, evaluation techniques, and information management. Each session covers two or three tools selected from this list.

This course is sponsored by EPA's Office of Wetlands, Oceans, and Watersheds, and is intended for watershed managers, staff, and program leaders from states, tribes, and territories; local governments; EPA regional and headquarters staff; and other watershed practitioners.

For more information, contact Anne Weinberg, USEPA (4503T), 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20460. Phone: (202) 566-1217; E-mail: Anne Weinberg (weinberg.anne@epa.gov) or Watershed Academy (wacademy@epa.gov)

Watersheds 106: Watershed Partnership Seminar
This 2-week residential course emphasizes the establishment and maintenance of watershed-based partnerships necessary to build healthy and sustainable watersheds. It is designed to provide training in the natural and human aspects of the watershed management process so that participants understand their importance and have the confidence to go back to their watershed and participate in developing and implementing an ecologically sustaining watershed strategy. The seminar includes an overview of the ecological principles related to watershed planning, the governmental programs designed to support watershed protection goals, and the benefits of watershed management. The course, taught by people involved in cooperative watershed rojects and technical experts, blends the human and scientific elements of watershed protection through state-of-the-art case study examples and practical skills and tools, including organizational development and team building skills and frameworks for building sustainable watershed plans. The techniques taught will help participants develop plans and strategies to meet the goals and priorities of several federal, state, and tribal watershed efforts, including the section 319 Clean Water Act Nonpoint Source program.

This course is sponsored by EPA Office of Water's Office of Wetlands, Oceans, and Watersheds. It is intended for community representatives and environmental managers and staff using watershed- or community-based approaches for environmental protection. The course is recommended for EPA regional and headquarters staff; staff from other federal agencies; state, tribal, and local agencies; environmental organizations; corporations; and other parties interested in building or participating in community-based environmental planning and decision making. The course is limited to 40 people and costs approximately $3,000, which covers tuition, lodging, and meals.

For more information, contact Theresa Trainor, USEPA (4504T), 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington DC 20460; Phone: (202) 566-1250; E-mail: Theresa Trainor (trainor.theresa@epa.gov) or Watershed Academy (wacademy@epa.gov)

Watersheds 107: Watershed Planning: Developing Effective Watershed-Based Plans That Solve Water Quality Problems
EPA and state water resource agencies are moving toward a more quantitative approach for watershed-based nonpoint source pollution projects. Over the past few years, EPA has listed nine key elements for watershed-based nonpoint source pollution control plans that focus on quantifying existing pollutant loads, estimating the reductions needed, and calculating how much can be achieved through best management practice (BMP) implementation. The planning approach recommended is also useful for implementing BMPs designed to achieve load reductions outlined in a TMDL or for protecting water resources threatened by increasing development, land use changes, or other stressors. This training course provides an overview of the nine plan elements and how watershed plans can be developed to address these elements.

For more information, contact Barry Tonning at Tetra Tech, Inc., 10306 Eaton Place, Suite 340, Fairfax, VA 22020. Phone (703) 385-6000 ext. 160; E-mail: Barry Tonning (barry.tonning@tetratech-ffx.com); or Stuart Lehman USEPA (4503T), 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20460. Phone: (202) 566-1205; E-mail: Stuart Lehman (lehman.stuart@epa.gov)

Watersheds 108: Watershed Academy Webcast Seminars
The Watershed Academy offers Webcast seminars where trainees log in by Web and/or phone to participate in live training conducted by expert instructors. EPA plans to conduct monthly Webcast seminars. Pre-registration for these seminars will be publicized over electronic discussion list-servers and on EPA's Watershed Academy Web site. While the Internet-based training will be available to a limited number of registered participants, a streaming audio version of the training will be made available after the live seminar for the public to listen to and view.

More information on Webcast seminars including descriptions and schedules can be found on the Web at: Watershed Webcasts. If you have additional questions, you may contact Anne Weinberg, USEPA (4503T), 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20460; Phone: (202) 566-1217; E-mail: Anne Weinberg (weinberg.anne@epa.gov) or Watershed Academy (wacademy@epa.gov)

OTHER EPA OFFICE OF WATER TRAINING COURSES

BASINS: A Powerful Tool for Managing Watersheds
This weeklong course is designed to provide technical training and guidance to states, territories, and tribes using Better Assessment Science Integrating Point and Nonpoint Sources (BASINS) to perform integrated water quality and watershed analyses. The course covers an introduction to basic geographic information system (GIS) operations, BASINS environmental data layers, nonpoint source modeling, and in-stream water quality assessments. The course includes extensive hands-on training in computer applications.

EPA's Office of Science and Technology sponsors this course. Persons interested in watershed management, development of Total Maximum Daily Loads (TMDLs), coastal zone management, nonpoint source programs, water quality modeling, National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permitting, and other related programs are urged to attend. Participants should have a background in water quality modeling, a basic understanding of GIS applications, and familiarity with the Windows environment. Familiarity with ArcView (Ver. 3.x) basic operations is helpful.

In addition to the BASINS course, a number of courses are offered on modeling applications that integrate and work with BASINS. To see the availability of courses such as AQUATOX, HSPF, SWAT, CORMIX, and others, please visit this Web site: BASINS Training.

For more information, contact Russ Kinerson, USEPA (4305T), 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20460. Phone: (202) 566-0392; E-mail: Russell Kinerson (kinerson.russell@epa.gov)

Community Culture and the Environment: A Guide to Understanding a Sense of Place
This 1- or 2-day course discusses the concepts of community and culture and offers tools for assessing and understanding the social dynamics and local values involved in watershed protection. Using a dynamic, hands-on approach, the course provides a suggested community cultural assessment process and shows participants how they can use the results of the assessment for, among other things, defining their community; building consensus/coalitions; communicating across cultures, visioning, planning, and developing social indicators. The course includes 16 community characteristics and related questions to help focus the assessment process. These characteristics range from community capacity, information flow, and local identity to demographics, property ownership, and governance. Seventeen tools and methods guide the collection of information. These tools include census and economic data, maps and geographic research, social mapping, interviewing, focus groups, surveys, and visual methods. The course features easy-to-use worksheets, case studies from around the country, presentations, and highly interactive exercises.

The course is sponsored and taught by EPA's Office of Wetlands, Oceans, and Watersheds. It is intended for leaders of and academicians in watershed protection, as well as federal, tribal, state, and local agencies seeking technical skills for improving stakeholder involvement processes.

For more information, contact Theresa Trainor, USEPA (4504T), 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20460. Phone: (202) 566-1250; E-mail: Theresa Trainor (trainor.theresa@epa.gov)

Community Growth Readiness Workshop Series (Southeast Watershed Forum)
A series of four distinct workshops are available for the southeast region that address different tools and strategies that local jurisdictions and community/watershed groups can employ to ensure sustainable growth in their communities.

Introduction to Community Growth Readiness (4 hours)
This workshop introduces elected officials, planning and public works officials, and other community leaders to the tools to design economically viable and watershed-friendly development practices. They learn about the economic impact of poor land use practices on water resources, as well as the economic, quality of life, and regulatory incentives for developing a different approach. Participants are invited to use a community-based process to evaluate and change their codes and ordinances.

Community Growth Readiness (7 hours)
The day-long workshop expands on economically viable development practices that are also watershed-friendly. Attendees assess their current practices, measure their ability to maintain water quality in the face of growth pressures, and learn about a community consensus-building process to implement change in their communities. The timing of this program makes it particularly relevant as communities-facing challenging Stormwater Phase II requirements-look for inexpensive, nonstructural approaches to managing polluted runoff. The training helps to overcome the disconnect between smart growth planning and watershed planning.

Multiple Jurisdiction Codes and Ordinances Review (4 hours)
In this workshop, planning and public works officials in different jurisdictions use a Codes and Ordinance Worksheet to evaluate their development rules. The results from all jurisdictions are recorded on a master worksheet. Officials have a structured opportunity to compare results and identify areas of common interest for improvement. This workshop provides a unique opportunity for city or county jurisdictions to develop consistency among their codes and ordinances to discourage development from going to communities with the least-formed land use guidelines.

Community Site-Planning Roundtable (5 hours)
This workshop enables a core team of key leaders and planning officials to reach agreement on the scope, process, participants, and logistics of conducting a watershed site planning roundtable process. A Leadership Team from a local "lead agency" and other key partners and planning officials develop a work plan with assigned responsibilities for conducting the roundtable workshop series. The team will define what it wants to accomplish; identify available resources and obstacles; decide upon a process and timeline; and consider who else needs to be involved. They will continue to meet periodically as needed throughout the 6-month to 1-year roundtable process to ensure the process reflects the priorities of the participating communities.

For more information, contact Christine Olsenius, Executive Director, Southeast Watershed Forum, 1 Vantage Way, Suite D-105, Nashville, TN 37228. Phone: (866) 902-7300; E-mail: Christine Olsenius (co@southeastwaterforum.org); Web: Southeast Watershed Forum Training Exit Disclaimer

Drinking Water Academy Training Courses
Established by EPA's Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water, the Drinking Water Academy (DWA) is a long-term training initiative whose primary goal is to expand EPA, state, and tribal capabilities to implement the 1996 Amendments to the Safe Drinking Water Act. To help address drinking water at the watershed level, the DWA offers three source water protection courses: (1) Delineation of Source Water Areas for Water Supply (2) Introduction to EPA's Drinking Water Source Protection Programs, and (3) Source Water Contamination Prevention Measures. The DWA also offers a series of other drinking water-related courses in the following topic areas:

  • Safe Drinking Water Act Overview (3 courses)
  • National Primary Drinking Water Regulations (10 courses)
  • Public Water System Operation (13 courses)
  • Public Water System Supervision Implementation (5 courses)
  • Sanitary Survey (3 courses)
  • Source Water Protection (3 courses)
  • Underground Injection Control (5 courses)
  • Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS) (17 courses)
  • Laboratory Certification (2 courses)
  • General Interest (5 courses)

For the latest information on course schedules, see the DWA Web site at: Calendar of Course Offerings.

For more information, contact James Bourne, USEPA (4606M), 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20460. Phone: (202) 564-4095; E-mail: James Bourne (bourne.james@epa.gov)

Getting in Step: A Pathway to Effective Outreach in Your Watershed
This course provides participants with a framework for developing and implementing successful outreach programs in their watersheds. Through a combination of presentations, group exercises, and panel discussions, participants learn the process for developing an outreach strategy, discover tips and tools to produce eye-catching materials, and learn ways to effectively distribute their message.

This course is taught by Tetra Tech, Inc., with funding support from EPA's Office of Wetlands, Oceans, and Watersheds and other organizations. The course is intended for audiences responsible for implementing watershed protection efforts at the federal, state, tribal, or local level.

For more information, contact Melissa DeSantis or Barry Tonning at Tetra Tech, Inc., 10306 Eaton Place, Suite 340, Fairfax, VA 22030. Phone: (703) 385-6000; E-mail: Melissa DeSantis (melissa.desantis@tetratech-ffx.com)  or Barry Tonning (barry.tonning@tetratech-ffx.com); Web: Watershed Training [BROKEN].

Getting in Step: Engaging and Involving Stakeholders in Your Watershed
This course provides participants with a framework for developing and implementing successful stakeholder involvement strategies for watershed management programs. Through a combination of presentations, group exercises, and panel discussions, participants learn how to identify driving forces, identify appropriate stakeholder involvement levels, manage cooperative group processes, and move from awareness to action.

This course is taught by Tetra Tech, Inc., with funding support from EPA's Office of Wetlands, Oceans, and Watersheds and other organizations. The course is intended for audiences responsible for implementing watershed protection efforts at the federal, state, tribal, or local level.

For more information, contact Melissa DeSantis or Barry Tonning at Tetra Tech, Inc., 10306 Eaton Place, Suite 340, Fairfax, VA 22030. Phone: (703) 385-6000; E-mail: Melissa DeSantis (melissa.desantis@tetratech-ffx.com)  or Barry Tonning (barry.tonning@tetratech-ffx.com); Web: Watershed Training [BROKEN].

Getting in Step with Phase II: A Workshop for Stormwater Program Managers
This workshop is designed for small communities and other entities that must comply with the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Phase II Stormwater Permit Program. The workshop covers basic program requirements and options for developing and implementing EPA's six minimum measures that small municipal separate storm sewer systems (MS4s) must incorporate, including: public education and outreach, public participation/involvement, illicit discharge detection and elimination, construction site runoff control, post-construction runoff, and pollution prevention/good housekeeping.

This course is taught by Tetra Tech, Inc., with funding support from EPA's Office of Wastewater Management and other agencies. This course is intended for state, regional, and local officials and program managers responsible for developing Stormwater Phase II programs.

For more information, contact Melissa DeSantis or Barry Tonning at Tetra Tech, Inc., 10306 Eaton Place, Suite 340, Fairfax, VA 22030. Phone: (703) 385-6000; E-mail: Melissa DeSantis (melissa.desantis@tetratech-ffx.com)  or Barry Tonning (barry.tonning@tetratech-ffx.com); Web: Watershed Training [BROKEN].

Monitoring Workshops for the National Estuary Program
These 2-day workshops help participants in the National Estuary Program (NEP) review and revise their existing Regional Integrated Monitoring Plan, a requirement of each NEP's Comprehensive Conservation and Management Plan. Specific topics include environmental and programmatic indicators, funding issues, quality assurance, key management issues, and data management.

These workshops are sponsored by EPA's Office of Wetlands, Oceans, and Watersheds, Oceans and Coastal Protection Division. The workshops are offered in NEP study areas and are intended for local, state, and federal monitoring management and staff.

For more information, contact Joe Hall, USEPA (4504T), 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20460. Phone: (202) 566-1241, E-mail: Joe Hall (hall.joe@epa.gov)

National Environmental Training Center for Small Communities
The National Environmental Training Center for Small Communities, along with the National Drinking Water Clearinghouse and the National Small Flows Clearinghouse, is a program of The National Environmental Services Center (NESC). NESC assists small and rural communities and systems with their drinking water, wastewater, solid waste, and infrastructure security needs. NESC's staff of environmental specialists, engineers, technical writers, and environmental training specialists provide information, assistance, products, and training to help small systems and communities find solutions to the problems they face.

NESC offers several environmental training curricula and courses for small communities including Managing a Small Drinking Water System: A Short Course for Local Officials; Preparing for the Unexpected: Security for Small Water Systems; Assessing Wastewater Options for Small Communities; and Solid Waste Management Options. Environmental training courses are also offered at NESC's annual Environmental Training Institute for Small Communities, and through tailored environmental training for specific audiences.

NESC experts offer free information through a toll free number; regular publications such as the Small Flows Journal, On Tap, E-Train, and Pipeline; and through the NESC Web site Exit Disclaimer. NESC's commitment to address small community environmental needs is accomplished through cooperative partnerships with technical experts, environmental trainers, and other assistance providers. NESC receives funding from the U.S. EPA Office of Water, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and other sources to provide training and technical assistance to small and rural communities.

For more information, contact Sandra Fallon, NESC, P.O. Box 6064, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26505-6064; Toll-free (800) 624-8301; E-mail: Sandra Fallon (sfallon@mail.wvu.edu); Web: www.nesc.wvu.edu  Exit Disclaimer

Nonpoint Education for Municipal Officials Training
The University of Connecticut Cooperative Extension System offers training through its Nonpoint Education for Municipal Officials (NEMO) Project. NEMO is an educational program that addresses the relationship between land use and natural resource protection, with a focus on water resources. To help create effective presentations, NEMO relies on advanced technologies like geographic information systems, remote sensing, and the Internet. In Connecticut, NEMO offers many different workshops under four main topics: (1) linking land use to water quality, (2) natural resource-based planning, (3) preservation, and (4) development. Most workshops are approximately 1 hour in length and are often followed up by individual consultation and materials to help communities get started on natural resource-based planning. Member projects of the National NEMO Network conduct similar workshops in more than 30 states and can be contacted through the Connecticut project.

NEMO is funded in part by EPA's Office of Water. The workshops are intended for local land use decision makers such as planning commissions and local government staff.

For more information, contact David Dickson, NEMO, University of Connecticut Cooperative Extension, 1066 Saybrook Road, Box 70, Haddam, CT 06438-0070; Phone: (860) 345-5228; E-mail: NEMO (nemo@uconn.edu); Web: The NEMO Program Exit Disclaimer or CLEAR: Center for Land Use Education and Research Exit Disclaimer

NPDES Permit Writers' Training Course
This 5-day training course provides the basic regulatory framework and technical considerations that support the development of wastewater discharge permits required under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES). A multidisciplinary faculty presents the course using a combination of lectures, case examples, and practical exercises. The course begins with an introduction to the history of the NPDES program and its relationship to other Clean Water Act programs. Attention is given to the role of NPDES permitting within a watershed management approach. Participants then become acquainted with the regulatory requirements of the NPDES program and the tools and resources available to assist them in writing NPDES permits.

The course, presented by EPA's Office of Wastewater Management, is designed for NPDES permit writers with 6 months to 2 years of experience. Veteran permit writers and other water program staff also find the course useful and enjoyable and make up a growing percentage of course participants.

For information on course scheduling, contact Betty Peterson, Tetra Tech, Inc., 10306 Eaton Place, Suite 340, Fairfax, VA 22030. Phone: (703) 385-6000 ext. 181; E-mail: Betty Peterson (betty.peterson@tetratech-ffx.com). For information on course content, contact Pravin Rana, USEPA (4203M), 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20460. Phone: (202) 564-1909; E-mail: Pravin Rana (rana.pravin@epa.gov); Web: NPDES Training Courses and Workshops.

NPDES Permits Program Overview Course for Permitees: Including New and Emerging Issues
The National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit development and issuance process requires a significant investment of resources for both the permitting authority and the permit holder. This course will provide training on the basic requirements and methods for issuing NPDES permits for the permit holder and permit writer. Its objective is to increase understanding by both parties to help reduce permit issuance time and lead to increased permit compliance.

The program, which includes lecture and discussion, provides attendees with a strong understanding of the purpose of the NPDES program, as well as the mechanics for developing, issuing, and implementing an NPDES permit. The course covers legal issues that a permit holder would have to consider and provides a synopsis and review of new innovative tools that may be used in the NPDES permit process, such as electronic tools for data organization and data analysis needed for permit issuance. There will also be discussions on new water quality approaches such as watershed-based permitting and water quality trading.

The course is taught by a team of instructors with varied experience including senior EPA headquarters and EPA regional staff as well as non-EPA experts. The course is generally offered two to four times a year in various locations around the country.

For more information, contact Lara Hughes, Water Environment Federation, 601 Wythe Street, Alexandria, VA 22314-1994. Phone: (703) 684-2442; E-mail: Lara Hughes (lhughes@wef.org); or Pat Bradley, USEPA (4203M), 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20460. Phone: (202) 564-0729; E-mail: Pat Bradley (bradley.patrick@epa.gov); Web: Water Environment Federation Exit Disclaimer or NPDES Training Courses and Workshops.

Pretreatment Training: Introduction and Intermediate Topics
This training comprises two sections: The Introduction section provides the basic regulatory and technical framework that supports the development and implementation of pretreatment programs under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) and the Clean Water Act (CWA). The Intermediate section focuses on permit development and issuance for industrial dischargers. The objective of this section of the training course is to provide the framework for collecting, managing, and applying the information necessary to develop and issue individual control mechanisms (permits) to industrial dischargers. The course includes extensive discussion of the process for reviewing industrial information to determine appropriate categorization of the industry and subsequent effluent limit derivation.

This course is designed and recommended for environmental professionals responsible for developing and implementing the pretreatment program at the local level, industrial dischargers, consultants, and especially individuals with less than 2 years in a pretreatment program. It is generally held two to four times per year in various locations around the country.

For more information, contact Lara Hughes, Water Environment Federation, 601 Wythe Street, Alexandria, VA 22314-1994. Phone: (703) 684-2442; E-mail: Lara Hughes (lhughes@wef.org);  or Jan Pickrel, USEPA, (4203M) 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington, DC. Phone: (202) 564-7904; E-mail: Jan Pickrel (pickrel.jan@epa.gov); Web: Water Environment Federation Exit Disclaimer or NPDES Training Courses and Workshops.

Pretreatment Training: Intermediate and Advanced Topics
In the Intermediate section of the course, information is provided on the control of industrial discharges by focusing on permit development and issuance. There is extensive discussion of the process for reviewing industrial information to determine appropriate categorization of the industry and subsequent effluent limit derivation.

The Advanced section focuses on the development and application of pretreatment standards with a focus on local limits. The advanced course is designed and recommended for environmental professionals responsible for developing and implementing the pretreatment program at the local level, industrial dischargers, and consultants. The Advanced course assumes an intermediate level of familiarity with pretreatment program requirements and is not recommended for individuals who have not taken an introductory level course. This course is generally offered two to four times per year in various locations around the country.

For more information, contact Lara Hughes, Water Environment Federation, 601 Wythe Street, Alexandria, VA 22314-1994. Phone: (703) 684-2442; E-mail: Lara Hughes (lhughes@wef.org);  or Jan Pickrel, USEPA, (4203M) 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington, DC. Phone: (202) 564-7904; E-mail: Jan Pickrel (pickrel.jan@epa.gov); Web: Water Environment Federation Exit Disclaimer or NPDES Training Courses and Workshops.

Smart Growth Leadership Program
The University of Maryland's National Center for Smart Growth Research and Education focuses on how governments can coordinate to build sustainable communities by channeling economic and residential development in a more environmentally conscious, cost-effective manner. They offer a pilot course in Maryland and in surrounding states that can serve as the first step to help local governments work with relevant state and federal agencies to define the goals and scope of a coordination strategy for smart growth. Local governments can, at their option, plan for or develop such a strategy in an intergovernmental workshop, which could include the following:

  • Sessions on issues (environment, transportation, and community development) and on leadership/negotiation skills for participants to better understand each others' work, and how their fragmented authorities can together form a big picture mosaic of smart growth
  • Working groups (local, state, and federal officials for each participating locality) to draft a potential action strategy of procedures to coordinate authorities and programs relevant to local issues
  • Scoping creative deals to help frame the potential action strategy

EPA's Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water (OGWDW) provided initial support for the development of this course. It is intended for staff members from special interest organizations and federal, state, and local governments to enable them to lead coordination efforts that will advance smart growth by reducing bureaucratic territorialism, unnecessary conflict, and wasteful fragmentation.

For more information, contact Molly Martin, University of Maryland Center for Smart Growth Research and Education, 1112K Preinkert Field House, College Park, MD 20742-1821. Phone: (301) 405-6788; E-mail: mhmartin@umd.edu; Web: www.smartgrowth.umd.edu/index.htm .

Clean Water SRF 101
This course provides a basic understanding of how the Clean Water State Revolving Fund (SRF) program works and how it can provide funding for an extensive array of water quality-related activities to support watershed protection. With assets exceeding $52 billion, the Clean Water SRF has become the primary affordable source for communities to finance wastewater treatment projects as well as critical watershed activities, including wetlands protection, agricultural and animal best management practices, estuaries, brownfields remediation, ground water protection, septic and decentralized systems, and other nonpoint source activities.

Participants will learn about applying for assistance, setting state funding priorities, developing creative funding mechanisms to address critical needs, designing innovative ways to solve water quality problems, using the Clean Water SRF to supplement other available funding sources, and applying case studies of successful approaches to watershed protection.

This course, sponsored by EPA's Office of Wastewater Management, is intended for watershed and Clean Water SRF managers and staff, state and local program managers, EPA regional and headquarters staff, and other interested watershed practitioners. The course may be tailored to meet particular region or state needs.

For more information, contact Sheila Platt, USEPA, Office of Wastewater Management, State Revolving Fund Branch (4204M), 1201 Constitution Avenue, NW, Washington, DC, 20460. Phone: (202) 564-0686; E-mail: platt.sheila@epa.gov

STORET
This 2- to 2½ -day course explains how to install, operate, and maintain EPA's modernized STORET (STOrage and RETrieval) environmental data system. STORET is a repository for water quality, biological, habitat, and physical data and is used by state environmental agencies, EPA and other federal agencies, universities, private citizens, and others. This course also covers accessing STORET data from the STORET Warehouse using a Web browser and incorporating the data into commonly used software applications such as spreadsheets. This course is intended for STORET clients and can be customized to meet specific interests and needs.

For more information, contact STORET User Assistance. Phone: (800) 424-9067; E-mail: STORET User Assistance (STORET@epa.gov). Additional information, including the names and phone numbers of EPA regional office STORET coordinators, is available through the STORET Web page.

Stream Corridor and Floodplain Restoration
This 2-day workshop emphasizes the practical aspects of stream and floodplain restoration and is designed for professionals concerned about flooding, habitat, water quality, and erosion associated with rivers and streams. The workshop focuses on in-the-field application of restoration concepts, and it includes classroom instruction covering the principles and concepts of river restoration projects, planning and funding, project design, project construction, and monitoring.

EPA's Office of Wetlands, Oceans, and Watersheds, Wetlands Division, provided support for the initial development of this workshop, which continues to be conducted periodically by the Association of State Floodplain Managers and various partners. It is designed specifically for practicing professionals looking for a forum to learn about current restoration practices and to discuss their application to specific landscapes and conditions. The course is adapted to the landscape of each host location, but the topics offered are relevant for anyone.

For more information, contact Diane Brown, Association of State Floodplain Managers, 2809 Fish Hatchery Road, Suite 204, Madison, WI 53713. Phone: (608) 274-0123; E-mail: Diane Brown (diane@floods.org); Web: Association of State Floodplain Managers Exit Disclaimer

Tribal Nonpoint Source Program Workshop
This 2-day course provides information to tribes about the procedures of the Clean Water Act section 319 Program (Nonpoint Source Program), explains what is required to become eligible for section 319 funds, and demonstrates how to prepare section 319 proposals. Other topics include applying for treatment as a state status, preparing Nonpoint Source (NPS) Assessment Reports, developing NPS management programs, and preparing watershed plans. Tribes are invited to share their experiences so that others can learn from them.

This course is sponsored by EPA's Office of Wetlands, Oceans, and Watersheds, Assessment and Watershed Protection Division. EPA's objective is to hold four workshops every year around the country.

For more information, contact Stacie Craddock, USEPA (4503T), 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20460. Phone: (202) 566-1204; E-mail: Stacie Craddock (craddock.stacie@epa.gov)

Volunteer Monitoring for Estuaries
EPA sponsors 2- to 3-day volunteer estuary monitoring workshops nationwide to encourage volunteer monitoring in estuaries, enhance networking among programs, and improve the quality of volunteer data. In addition, the workshops help encourage and assist volunteer monitoring coordinators to be more effective in all aspects of planning and implementation of volunteer monitoring. Specific topics include methods, quality assurance, working with the news media, networking, creative funding, data management, and use of the Internet. The Volunteer Estuary Monitoring Manual is a useful resource for the volunteer.

The Ocean Conservancy conducts these workshops, with funding support provided by EPA's Office of Wetlands, Oceans, and Watersheds, Oceans and Coastal Protection Division. The workshops are conducted in coastal areas nationwide, particularly in areas where National Estuary Programs are located. The intended audience includes volunteer monitoring coordinators who manage a group of volunteers in monitoring estuarine areas and is limited to 50 participants.

For more information, contact Joe Hall, USEPA (4504F), 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20460. Phone: (202) 566-1241, E-mail: Joe Hall (hall.joe@epa.gov); or Seba Shevely, The Ocean Conservancy, 1432 North Great Neck Road, Suite 103, Virginia Beach, VA 23454. Phone: (757) 496-0920

Water Quality Standards Academy
This comprehensive and highly structured basic course introduces participants to all aspects of the water quality standards program, including the interpretation and application of the water quality standards regulation; policies and program guidance; development of water quality criteria (including human health, aquatic life, bacteria, biological, and nutrient); and other aspects of the program, including designated uses, antidegradation policies, mixing zone policies, and use attainability analyses (UAAs). States and tribes adopt water quality standards as laws or regulations. Water quality standards are the backbone of the watershed protection approach to pollution control.

EPA's Office of Science and Technology sponsors this course, which is a basic introductory course designed for those with fewer than 6 months of experience with the water quality standards program. Others can also benefit from the course, including veterans of the water quality standards program who want a refresher course.

For more information, go to the Water Quality Standards Academy Web site or contact Tamarra Brewster, USEPA (4503T), 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20460. Phone: (202) 566-1071; E-mail: Tamarra Brewster (brewster.tamarra@epa.gov)

Water Quality Standards Academy for Indian Tribes
This comprehensive and highly structured basic course introduces tribal participants to all aspects of the water quality standards program, including the interpretation and application of the water quality standards regulation; policies and program guidance; development of water quality criteria (human health, aquatic life, bacteria, biological, and nutrient); and other aspects of the program. States and tribes adopt water quality standards as laws or regulations. Water quality standards are the backbone of the watershed protection approach to pollution control.

EPA's Office of Science and Technology sponsors this course, which is designed for tribal staff with fewer than 6 months of experience with the water quality standards program. Others can also benefit from the course, including veterans of the water quality standards program who want a refresher course.

In addition to this basic introductory course, EPA frequently offers training courses and workshops specifically designed for tribes.

For more information, contact Tamarra Brewster, USEPA (4305-T), 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20460. Phone: (202) 260-7301; E-mail: Tamarra Brewster (brewster.tamarra@epa.gov)

Water Resource Management: A System-Wide Approach to Integrating Watersheds and Reservoir Systems
This 2½-day workshop covers reservoir limnological processes and water quality management opportunities, sampling methodologies and data collection, watershed management and in-reservoir and tailwater engineering technologies, and post-project operations and assessment. Participants acquire classroom knowledge, the workshop manual, and computer codes to aid in assessment and design.

The workshop was developed under a grant from the EPA Office of Water's Nonpoint Source Control Branch. The Environmental Laboratory and the Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory of the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center, Waterways Experiment Station, conduct the workshop, using an interdisciplinary team of engineers and scientists. The target audience for this course includes Corps of Engineers planners, engineers, hydrologists and project personnel; local and regional EPA officials; federal and state soil conservation agencies; state water pollution control agencies; state and federal fish and wildlife agencies; hydropower producers and power administrators; local lake associations and lake and reservoir managers; and municipal water associations.

For more information, contact Laurin Yates, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Engineer Research and Development Center, Vicksburg, MS 39180-6199. Phone: (601) 634-3792; E mail: Laurin Yates (yatesl@wes.army.mil)

Watershed Leadership Institutes
The Watershed Leadership Institutes empower local watershed leaders with the skills, tools, and confidence to assess, design, and implement effective programs in their home watersheds. The training combines classroom time, design exercises, and field visits to provide a comprehensive learning experience. The institutes also provide caucuses, networking, extensive online support materials, and 6 hours of consulting with Center for Watershed Protection staff once participants return home.

The Watershed Leadership Institutes include the Watershed Protection Institute (WPI) and the Watershed Restoration Institute (WRI). WPI trains watershed leaders on how to conduct local site planning roundtables and prepare small watershed plans to protect the health of less developed watersheds, particularly those with rural and newly urbanizing communities. WRI focuses on watershed restoration techniques that include stream and upland assessments to identify restoration opportunities; stormwater retrofitting; and stream restoration.

For more information, contact Rebecca Winer, Center for Watershed Protection, 8390 Main Street, 2nd Floor, Ellicott City, MD 21043. Phone: (410) 461-8323 ext. 213; E-mail: Rebecca Winer (rrw@cwp.org); Web: Center for Watershed Protection Exit Disclaimer

Watershed Leadership Train-the-Trainer Academy (Southeast Watershed Forum)
This intensive 3-day training workshop focuses on providing the information, resources, and tools to local "leaders" who agree to train others to develop land and water quality protection strategies for their communities. Attendees commit to conducting the training in at least four other organizations in their community over the next year. Attendees include watershed organizations, local government, state watershed/319 program coordinators, and stormwater managers primarily from the southeast region. Through lectures, field trips, small work-group sessions, and "lessons learned" from past graduates, attendees are immersed in the practical aspects of topics such as the following:

  • Basic tools needed for land and water quality protection
  • Best management practices (BMPs) that reduce the impacts of development
  • Economic incentives for smarter growth
  • Assistance to communities in meeting stormwater regulations
  • Facilitation of local partnerships for land and water protection
  • Consensus-based process for changing development rules
  • Public negotiation and conflict resolution
For more information, contact Christine Olsenius, Executive Director, Southeast Watershed Forum, 1 Vantage Way Suite D-105, Nashville, TN 37228. Phone: (866) 902-7300; E-mail:  Christine Olsenius (co@southeastwaterforum.org); Web: Southeast Watershed Forum Training Exit Disclaimer

Watershed and Pre-Disaster Mitigation Planning
Watershed planning is required by various agencies, especially programs within EPA. FEMA administers several hazard mitigation grant programs and requires communities to have hazard mitigation plans in place in order to be eligible for hazard mitigation grant funds. Watershed and Hazard Mitigation Plans are all too often stand-alone documents that fail to address common issues and efforts. This 1-day workshop identifies linkages among EPA, FEMA and NRCS programs and offers guidance to state and community officials on how to link the goals and objectives and best combine watershed and pre-disaster mitigation planning efforts. Case studies of community planning successes that integrate watershed and hazard mitigation concerns are presented, along with cutting-edge community approaches such as No Adverse Impact and Green Infrastructure.

EPA's Office of Wetlands, Oceans, and Watersheds, Wetlands Division, provided support for the initial development of this workshop, which continues to be conducted periodically by the Association of State Floodplain Managers and various partners. The workshop is designed to attract local government and state agency staff involved in watershed and floodplain management and disaster mitigation planning.

For more information, contact Alan Lulloff, Association of State Floodplain Managers, 2809 Fish Hatchery Road, Suite 204, Madison, WI 53713. Phone: (608) 274-0123; E-mail: Alan Lulloff (alan@floods.org); Web: Association of State Floodplain Managers Exit Disclaimer

Watershed Workshops
This course is designed to train watershed managers around the country to protect, manage, and restore streams, lakes, and rivers. The course format offers single and multiday workshops, with both classroom and field time, to provide communities with specific guidance on the types and combinations of watershed protection and restoration tools available, leading to more effective local watershed protection and restoration efforts. The Center for Watershed Protection's base curriculum covers more than 60 training modules in several topic areas, including: watershed assessment, watershed planning, watershed restoration, better site design, stormwater program development, and stormwater practice design. When planning a watershed workshop, the Center for Watershed Protection works closely with a local partner to tailor the agenda to meet the needs of the local target audience, which may include watershed groups, engineers, government personnel, stormwater managers, developers, watershed planners, public officials, environmental organizations, and others interested in watershed protection or restoration.

For more information, contact Jennifer Zielinski, P.E., Center for Watershed Protection, 8390 Main Street, 2nd Floor, Ellicott City, MD 21043. Phone: (410) 461-8323 ext. 218; E-mail: Jennifer Zielinski (jaz@cwp.org); Web: Center for Watershed Protection Exit Disclaimer

Workshops for Development of Indicators for the National Estuary Programs
These 2- to 3-day workshops are designed to assist participants in the National Estuary Programs in developing indicators targeted for specific goals and objectives of their Comprehensive Conservation and Management Plans. Identification of and consensus on effective and sustainable indicators are essential to assess both the validity and effectiveness of management actions and environmental progress. Working from a list of possible indicators, participants then evaluate and prioritize the indicators for suitability for their program.

The workshops are sponsored by EPA's Office of Wetlands, Oceans, and Watersheds, Oceans and Coastal Protection Division. They are offered in NEP study areas and are intended for local, state, and federal monitoring management and staff in partnership with the NEPs.

For more information, contact Joe Hall, USEPA (4504T), 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20460. Phone: (202) 566-1241, E-mail: Joe Hall (hall.joe@epa.gov)


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