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Water: Key Features of an Active and Effective Water Security Program

Key Features - Case Studies

Key Features Case Studies Header Image EPA conducted several case studies to increase awareness of the benefits of implementing an active and effective protective program, and to document implementation of the Key Features of an Active and Effective Protective Program (Key Features).

The objectives of the cases studies were to:
  • Document how drinking water and wastewater utilities have successfully incorporated one or more of the Key Features into their operations.
  • Highlight benefits to utilities of implementing the Key Features.
  • Provide a methodology for other communities to use to replicate similar water security projects.
  • Raise awareness of the importance of drinking water and wastewater services, and the potential economic and human consequences of a loss of services to the business community.
  • Provide useful resources that could be used to promote Active and Effective Protective Programs, workshops and webcasts.

Key Features in Action Case Studies

EPA conducted several Key Features in Action case studies to document how two large drinking water utilities, two small drinking water utilities, and one wastewater utility successfully incorporated the key Features into their operations. The fact sheet provides examples of specific protective practices implemented by these utilities that can be replicated by other utilities; and highlights the benefits of implementing the key Features.

Fact Sheets

Seattle/King County Case Study

Key Features Seatle King County Image

EPA conducted the Seattle-King County, Washington Community Case Study project as a strategy to increase awareness about the benefits of implementing the Key Features. The purpose of the case study was to identify and document select examples of security practices being implemented within the Seattle-King County area. The report describes the case study approach; presents the results of the case study, including benefits, challenges and key findings; and documents 23 practices implemented in Seattle-King County area that support the Key Features. The fact sheet provides a summary of the project goals and findings, and details benefits and development steps for communities interested in conducting a similar case study.

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Chicagoland Case Study

Key Features Chicagoland Case Study Image

EPA Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water partnered with EPA Region 5 and the Chicago Manufacturing Center's Great Lakes Partnership Program on a pilot project in the Chicago metropolitan area. The Chicagoland Water and Wastewater Preparedness and Business Resiliency Pilot combined the concepts of water preparedness and business resiliency into an efficient and effective model for public-private partnership in critical infrastructure protection. An all-day summit explored interdependencies between the water sector and other sectors and started the dialogue needed to develop a framework for collaboration to address issues affecting water sector vulnerabilities and business resiliency.

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Hospital and Water Sector Interdependency Summit

Key Features Hospital Case Study Image

The Metropolitan Chicago Healthcare Council and EPA Region 5 cosponsored the Hospital and Water Sector Interdependency Summit - Keeping Patients Safe, on September 18th, 2008 in Chicago. The day-long summit was designed to promote a better understanding of public-private sector interdependencies, foster a greater understanding of water infrastructure and the potential impacts from loss of service, and identify resources needed to respond and recover from a water emergency. This report includes presentations featured at the summit; highlights of issues discussed/questions raised by participants; and recommended next steps.

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Evanston Water Emergency Roundtable

The Evanston Water Emergency Roundtable was held on September 2, 2009, in Evanston, Illinois. The Roundtable was designed to promote a better understanding of public-private sector interdependencies, foster a greater understanding of water infrastructure and the potential impacts from a loss of service, and identify actions and resources needed to respond to and recover from a water emergency. This report summarizes the information shared by the public and private sector participants and lists the possible follow-up action items identified during the roundtable. The report was not prepared by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (U.S. EPA) Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water, but was prepared as a collaborative effort between the Evanston Water Utility and the U.S. EPA Region 5.

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