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Water: Water Headlines

June 11, 2013

1) WaterSense Brings the Savings Home
2) EPA's Climate Ready Estuaries Program Highlights King Tides This Month
3) EPA Releases FY 2012 National Water Program's Best Practices and End of Year Performance Report
4) EPA Features Locally Led Efforts in Urban Water Restoration via Video Series
5) Success Spotlight: Upper Tonawanda Creek in New York


1) WaterSense Brings the Savings Home
With an additional 202 billion gallons of water saved from WaterSense labeled products in 2012, WaterSense and its partners have helped consumers save $8.9 billion in energy and water bills and 487 billion gallons of water since 2006. That's the amount of water used by all the homes in both Colorado and Arizona for a year! More than 2,700 water utilities, organizations, manufacturers, retailers, distributors, builders, and irrigation professionals have joined with EPA to promote WaterSense labeled products, programs, and new homes since the program was launched in 2006. Since then, more than 8,600 different models of toilets, faucets, showerheads, flushing urinals, and weather-based irrigation controllers have been independently certified for performance and efficiency to earn the WaterSense label. Read more about the WaterSense 2012 Accomplishments at http://www.epa.gov/watersense/about_us/milestones.html.

2) EPA's Climate Ready Estuaries Program Highlights King Tides This Month
EPA's Climate Ready Estuaries program is focusing on king tides this month. King tides are the highest predicted high tides of the year and can cause local tidal flooding. These tides provide an opportunity to catch a glimpse of the future because sea level rise will make today's king tides become the future's everyday tides. This year, Sarasota Bay and Tampa Bay Estuary Program have launched a Chasing the Waves: King Tide Photo Exhibit, and the Maryland Department of Natural Resources is seeking king tide photos for their king tide photo initiative. Find out when and where king tides will be occurring in your area. Learn more about king tides.

3) EPA Releases FY 2012 National Water Program's Best Practices and End of Year Performance Report
Do you know what percentage of the US population is served by community water systems that meet drinking water standards, or the number of previously impaired waterbodies that are now attaining water quality standards?  These answers and more are in EPA's Fiscal Year 2012 report on end of year results for over 130 measures of performance listed in EPA's 2011-2015 strategic plan and the FY 2012 National Water Program Guidance.  The report provides an overview of the progress in FY 2012 in meeting annual commitments and an analysis of long-term trend data, individual chapters on performance highlights, and management challenges for sub-objectives in the strategic plan including the core drinking water, water quality, and large aquatic ecosystem program areas. The report also includes best practices demonstrating innovations in program implementation in EPA's regional offices over the past year.  Access the report on EPA's water performance and accomplishment web site:  http://water.epa.gov/resource_performance/performance/index.cfm.

4) EPA Features Locally Led Efforts in Urban Water Restoration via Video Series
Urban Waters Voices: Bob ZimmermanEPA has released Urban Waters Voices, a series of 12 video interviews featuring locally led efforts to restore urban waters in communities across the United States. These videos feature local efforts and strategies to improve urban water quality while advancing local community priorities. This week's video spotlights Bob Zimmerman, Executive Director of the Charles River Watershed Association, describing some of the improvements seen in recent years, as well as challenges still faced by Charles River communities (e.g. legacy contamination). The Massachusetts organization uses science, advocacy, and the law to protect, preserve and enhance the Charles River and its watershed. Watch the video.

5) Success Spotlight: Upper Tonawanda Creek in New York
EPA's Clean Water Act Section 319 Program provides funding for restoration of nonpoint source-impaired water bodies. This week's success spotlight shines on Upper Tonawanda Creek in New York. Nutrients and sedimentation impaired the upper portion of Tonawanda Creek in Wyoming and Genesee counties in New York. As a result, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation included this segment on its priority waterbodies list in 1996 and added it to the state's list of impaired waters in 2004 for silt and sediment. Soil and water conservation districts worked with farmers to install agricultural best management practices, such as conservation tillage, cover cropping, pasture and grazing management, fencing, barnyard management systems, and waste storage and transfer systems. Reduced sedimentation and nutrient losses from farms helped improve water quality in Upper Tonawanda Creek, prompting New York remove this portion from its 2012 list of impaired waters. Read about Upper Tonawanda Creek.

 


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