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Water: Water Headlines

April 23, 2013

1) EPA Proposes to Reduce Toxic Pollutants Discharged into Waterways by Power Plants
2) EPA Honors Winners of First-Ever Campus RainWorks Challenge
3) Register for May 1st Webcast on Using Social Indicators in Watershed Management Projects
4) How's My Waterway App Now Has New Features
5) Success Spotlight: San Joaquin River in California


1) EPA Proposes to Reduce Toxic Pollutants Discharged into Waterways by Power Plants
Last week, EPA proposed a range of options to help reduce pollutants, including mercury, arsenic, lead, and selenium that are released into U.S. waterways by coal ash, air pollution control waste and other waste from steam electric power plants. The proposal includes a variety of options for whether and how these different waste streams should be treated. Steam electric power plants currently account for more than half of all toxic pollutants discharged into streams, rivers and lakes from permitted industrial facilities in the United States. EPA will take comment, to help inform the most appropriate final standard, for 60 days after publication in the Federal Register. More information: http://water.epa.gov/scitech/wastetech/guide/steam-electric/index.cfm

2) EPA Honors Winners of First-Ever Campus RainWorks Challenge
EPA announced the winners of its Campus RainWorks Challenge, a new design competition created to inspire the next generation of landscape architects, planners, and engineers to develop innovative green infrastructure systems that mitigate the impacts of urban stormwater while supporting vibrant, sustainable communities. More than 200 student teams participated, and four winners were chosen: Illinois Institute of Technology (1st prize, small institution), University of Florida (1st prize, large institution), Missouri University of Science and Technology (2nd prize, small institution), and University of Arizona (2nd prize, large institution). Many of the winning designs proposed transformative additions to the campus landscape that would reduce stormwater impacts while educating students about the movement of water through the urban environment. Learn more: http://water.epa.gov/infrastructure/greeninfrastructure/crw_winners.cfm

3) Register for May 1st Webcast on Using Social Indicators in Watershed Management Projects
Join us for a webcast on May 1, 2013 from 1:00 pm to 3:00 pm Eastern on using social indicators in watershed management projects. Working with landowners and managers to find effective and practical solutions to water quality problems is crucial to achieving environmental goals. Using social indicators can help resource managers and conservation professionals understand target audiences, select effective interventions, and evaluate their impacts. Social indicators provide information about the social context, awareness, attitudes, capacities, constraints, and behaviors in a watershed or project area. At the end of this webcast, participants will understand some basic concepts of behavior change and have the tools to use a framework for using social indicators in nonpoint source management work. To register for this Watershed Academy Webcast, please visit http://www.epa.gov/watershedwebcasts where the webcast presentation will be posted in advance. Webcast participants are eligible to receive a certificate for their attendance.

4) How's My Waterway App Now Has New Features
EPA's app and website, How's My Waterway, helps you find information on the condition of your local waterways, what's being done to protect and restore those waterways, and what you can do to help. And now, How's My Waterway lets people find out even more about their local waterways. The new features include search results color-coded by condition, local information on watersheds, a watershed locator tool, and options to look up dischargers regulated by permits and individual runoff control projects for a specific waterway. To view the app, visit: http://www.epa.gov/mywaterway

5) Success Spotlight: San Joaquin River in California
EPA's Clean Water Act Section 319 Program provides funding for restoration of nonpoint source-impaired water bodies. This week's success spotlight shines on San Joaquin River in California. Widespread use of the pesticide diazinon resulted in elevated concentrations toxic to aquatic life, and several portions of San Joaquin River was placed on California's list of impaired waters in 1992. Watershed stakeholders implemented agricultural best management practices in orchards, such as biological methods to replace chemical farming practices, maintenance of natural areas and hedgerows to provide habitat for beneficial insects to control pests. Partners also initiated discharge regulations and a diazinon total maximum daily load. As a result, pesticide concentrations decreased, prompting California to remove two river portions, the 3-mile Stanislaus River to Delta segment and the 14-mile Bear Creek to Mud Slough segment, from the state's list of impaired waters for diazinon in 2010. Click here for more information.

 


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