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Water: Water Headlines

March 5, 2013

1) New Biological Assessment Program Review Document Available Online
2) Success Spotlight: Neosho River in Kansas


1) New Biological Assessment Program Review Document Available Online
EPA has made available online the "Biological Assessment Program Review: Assessing Level of Technical Rigor to Support Water Quality Management," which provides a process for states and tribes to evaluate the technical rigor and breadth of capabilities of a biological assessment program. State and tribal water quality agencies face challenges to ensure that the best available science serves as the backbone of their monitoring and assessment programs. States and tribes can identify the technical capabilities and the limitations of their biological assessment programs and develop a plan to build on the program strengths and address the limitations. Biological assessment information is important to effectively and accurately answer water quality management questions about assessment of biological condition, protection of aquatic life, and tracking progress in restoration of degraded water bodies. To access the document, visit:
http://water.epa.gov/scitech/swguidance/standards/criteria/aqlife/biocriteria/technical_index.cfm

2) Success Spotlight: Neosho River in Kansas
EPA's Clean Water Act Section 319 Program provides funding for restoration of nonpoint source-impaired water bodies. This week's success spotlight shines on Neosho River in Kansas. Runoff from cattle grazing areas contributed high levels of fecal coliform bacteria to several waterbodies in Kansas' Twin Lakes watershed, including 20 miles of the Neosho River and 12 miles of Haun Creek, a tributary to the Neosho River. The state added the two segments to the state's list of impaired waters in 1998. Working with the local Kansas Watershed Restoration and Protection Strategy Twin Lakes Project, project partners implemented agricultural best management practices, such as prescribed grazing, range planting to reduce erosion, grassed waterways and filter strips to buffer between possible contamination sources and waterbodies, which contributed to lowered levels of fecal coliform bacteria. Kansas removed the two segments from the state's list of impaired waters in 2012. Click here for more information.

 


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