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Water: Water Headlines

March 12, 2013

1) Blog Spotlight: Preparing for Severe Weather
2) This Week is National Groundwater Awareness Week
3) Success Spotlight: Dry Creek in Alabama


1) Blog Spotlight: Preparing for Severe Weather
As part of severe weather preparedness week, EPA's John Whitler blogged about how water utilities can better prepare for and respond to severe weather events like hurricanes and floods. Water and wastewater agency response networks, known as WARNs, enable utilities to help one another restore service to the public after a severe weather event, and EPA's Climate Ready Water Utilities initiative provides utilities with practical and easy-to-use tools to promote a clear understanding of climate science and adaptation options. Read John's blog at: http://blog.epa.gov/blog/2013/03/a-warn-ing-for-water-utilities/

2) This Week is National Groundwater Awareness Week
Groundwater flows directly into streams, rivers, and lakes from beneath the ground and serves as a drinking water source for over 90 million people in the U.S. This week, you can help protect ground water by properly disposing of hazardous substances (such as not pouring them down the drain or flushing them down the toilet), applying the proper amount of fertilizers and pesticides in your yard, and getting your septic tank cleaned every two years. Learn about what we're doing to protect groundwater: http://water.epa.gov/type/groundwater/

3) Success Spotlight: Dry Creek in Alabama
EPA's Clean Water Act Section 319 Program provides funding for restoration of nonpoint source-impaired water bodies. This week's success spotlight shines on Dry Creek in Alabama. Runoff from pasture grazing contributed to elevated ammonia levels in Dry Creek in Alabama's Blount County, prompting the Alabama Department of Environmental Management to add the creek to the state's list of impaired waters in 1998. Implementing best management practices, such as including livestock exclusion fencing, alternative watering sources, alum treatment to reduce ammonia and bacteria in poultry litter, and a septic tank pump-out program, and conducting stakeholder education and outreach have led to improved water quality. Dry Creek now meets the ammonia water quality standard associated with its fish and wildlife designated use classification. As a result, Alabama removed a 12-mile segment of Dry Creek from the state's 2012 list for ammonia impairment. Click here for more information.

 


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