Jump to main content or area navigation.

Contact Us

Water: Water Headlines

September 4, 2012

1) Apartment and Condominium Units Can Earn WaterSense Label
2) EPA Video Highlights Utility Use of Clean Water State Revolving Fund to Invest in Water Recycling and Reuse
3) Success Spotlight: Buck Creek, Texas
4) Blog Spotlight: Leaving the Outhouse Behind


1) Apartment and Condominium Units Can Earn WaterSense Label
EPA has modified its specification for new homes to enable apartment and condominium units to earn the label, update product requirements, and adjust landscape criteria. WaterSense-labeled new homes allow residents to enjoy the comforts of home and save water and energy inside and out by using WaterSense-labeled plumbing fixtures, efficient hot water systems, and low-maintenance, water-smart landscapes. Homes labeled after January 1, 2013 must meet the criteria of the revised specification. Highlights include:· New apartments or condos can earn the WaterSense label. Individual units in new residential buildings are eligible to earn the label, and builders must ensure that the common areas of these buildings also meet specific indoor and outdoor criteria.

· WaterSense now requires builders of WaterSense-labeled homes to use EPA's Water Budget Tool to inform their landscape design. An easy-to-use, interactive version is available on the WaterSense website.

· If an irrigation system with a weather-based irrigation controller is used to water the lawn, the controller must be a WaterSense-labeled model. WaterSense labeled controllers act like a thermostat for your lawn, using local weather data to determine when and how much to water.

· Showerheads must be WaterSense-labeled models that use 2.0 gallons per minute or less. WaterSense labeled showerheads save homeowners more than 2,300 gallons of water and 300 kilowatt-hours of energy per year. Click here for more information.

2) EPA Video Highlights Utility Use of Clean Water State Revolving Fund to Invest in Water Recycling and Reuse
EPA has made available online a video highlighting the Inland Empire Utilities Agency, a regional wastewater service provider and distributor of wholesale and recycled water in California, which used the Clean Water State Revolving Fund (SRF) Program to conserve water and reduce energy usage and greenhouse gas emissions. Efforts included pipeline construction for recycled water, watershed restoration and an energy efficiency project that reduced the weight and related energy cost of processing biosolids in wastewater treatment. The Clean Water SRF program, through the Green Project Reserve (GPR), helps achieve innovative solutions to wastewater infrastructure needs through projects that address green infrastructure, water efficiency, energy efficiency, or other environmentally innovative activities. Click here for the video and here for more information on the fund's Green Project Reserve.

3) Success Spotlight: Buck Creek, Texas
EPA's Clean Water Act Section 319 Program provides funding for restoration of nonpoint source-impaired water bodies. This week's success spotlight shines on Buck Creek, Texas. Buck Creek is a small stream surrounded by rural and agricultural landscapes, with land used primarily for row crops and grasslands. High levels of E. coli bacteria, primarily from wildlife, livestock and humans, prompted the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality to add the creek to the state's list of impaired waters in 2000. Extensive public outreach and education efforts increased public awareness of the condition of the creek and led to voluntary implementation of best management practices by landowners, such as installing alternative watering sources for livestock, implementing prescribed grazing, and installing fencing to manage livestock distribution and access to the creek. As a result of reduced bacteria levels, the commission removed Buck Creek from its list of impaired waters in 2010. Click here for more information.

4) Blog Spotlight: Leaving the Outhouse Behind
How does the history of the flush toilet in the United States relate to the science behind protecting clean water? Lahne Mattas-Curry from EPA's Office or Research and Development explains in the first of a weekly blog series on the role science and innovation play in the Clean Water Act. Click here to read the blog.

 


Jump to main content.