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Water: Water Headlines

September 18, 2012

1) Webinar on Solar Energy for Water and Wastewater Utilities on October 11
2) Information on Uses and Benefits of Decentralized Wastewater Treatment Available Online
3) Blog spotlight: Wildfires Impact Water Resources in Colorado
4) Blog Spotlights: A Day Without Water and Water Utility Preparedness
5) Success Spotlight: Beaver and Doga Creeks, Oklahoma


1) Webinar on Solar Energy for Water and Wastewater Utilities on October 11
On Thursday, October 11, 2012, from 1:00 pm to 2:30 pm EST, EPA will host a webinar on solar energy and water and wastewater utilities. The webinar will detail the process of implementing solar energy projects in such utilities, the various types of solar technologies available, and where they can be most appropriately used, while highlighting innovative funding approaches (including those with no up-front capital requirements) that result in long-term energy cost savings and stability. The webinar will present the case study of a successful solar installation at a small water utility in Grafton, Massachusetts. Click here to register for this free webinar. For additional information, please contact Jim Horne at (202) 564-0571 or horne.james@epa.gov. Slides of two previous webinars on this topic can be viewed here.

2) Information on Uses and Benefits of Decentralized Wastewater Treatment Available Online
EPA has made available online information on the uses and benefits of decentralized wastewater treatment and examples of where they have played an effective role in a community's wastewater treatment infrastructure. Decentralized wastewater treatment consists of a variety of onsite approaches for collection, treatment, dispersal, and reuse of wastewater and can be a sustainable and appropriate option for communities and homeowners. The four papers include an introductory paper as well as three papers that demonstrate how decentralized wastewater treatment can be: a sensible solution, cost-effective and economical, green and sustainable, and protective of the environment, public health, and water quality. Click here for more information.

3) Blog spotlight: Wildfires Impact Water Resources in Colorado
 Nancy Stoner, acting Assistant Administrator for EPA's Office of Water, has blogged about her visit to a fire-ravaged area near Colorado Springs. In the blog, Ms. Stoner credits emergency responder efforts to protect water resources, such as the U.S. Forest Service's mulching and straw application for soil restoration and promotion of forest regeneration, while noting EPA's ongoing funding for additional watershed restoration through its Clean Water Act Section 319 nonpoint source program. Click here to read the blog.

4) Blog Spotlights: A Day Without Water and Water Utility Preparedness
September is National Preparedness Month. EPA's Laura Flynn imagines a day where water service is interrupted and how it might affect her family, while Lauren Wisniewski blogs about water utility preparedness, highlighting several water utilities that are succeeding in their preparedness efforts. Click here for the blog on "A Day Without Water" and here for the "Water Utility Preparedness" blog.

5) Success Spotlight: Beaver and Doga Creeks, Oklahoma
EPA's Clean Water Act Section 319 Program provides funding for restoration of nonpoint source-impaired water bodies. This week's success spotlight shines on Beaver and Doga Creeks, Oklahoma. Beaver and Doga creeks run through a watershed of mostly cattle production with some forage and wheat production. Livestock grazing management practices had contributed to excess sedimentation and nutrient runoff into the creek, leading to overgrowth of algae and a decline in dissolved oxygen levels in the creeks. As a result, Oklahoma added Beaver Creek and Doga Creek to the state's list of impaired waters in 2004 and 2006, respectively. Best management practices, such as livestock exclusion fencing, installation of alternative watering sources and establishment of vegetative cover near the water, helped to reduce erosion, sedimentation and nutrient runoff from grazing lands. Oxygen levels have improved, prompting Oklahoma to remove Beaver and Doga creeks from its list of imparied waters in 2010. Click here for more information.

 


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