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Water: Water Headlines

July 31, 2012

1) New EPA Tool Helps Estimate the Affordability of Water Pollution Control Requirements
2) A Function-Based Framework for Stream Assessment and Restoration Projects Available Online
3) Success Spotlight: Magees Creek, Mississippi -- Implementing Agricultural Best Management Practices Reduces Fecal Coliform Bacteria in Magees Creek
4) Clean Water Act 40th Anniversary Video Project: Ongoing


1) New EPA Tool Helps Estimate the Affordability of Water Pollution Control Requirements
EPA has released a new, web-based tool to help a variety of stakeholders evaluate the economic and social impacts of pollution controls needed to meet water quality standards set for specific uses for a waterbody, such as swimming or fishing. This tool could be used by states, territories, tribes, local governments, industry, municipalities and stormwater management districts.The tool will help stakeholders identify and organize the necessary information, and perform the calculations to evaluate the costs of pollution control requirements necessary to meet specific water quality standards. The tool prompts users to submit treatment technology information, alternative pollution reduction techniques and their costs and efficiencies, and financing information, as well as explain where that information can be found. Click here for more information. For additional information, contact Gary Russo at 202-566-1335 or email russo.gary@epa.gov

2) A Function-Based Framework for Stream Assessment and Restoration Projects Available Online
EPA has released a new technical resource to improve stream assessment and restoration for watershed practitioners. A Function-Based Framework for Stream Assessment and Restoration Projects lays out a framework for approaching stream assessment and restoration projects that focuses on understanding the suite of stream functions at a site in the context of what is happening in the watershed. The framework is an expansive resource covering watershed and river corridor processes, and the document provides several hypothetical examples and a detailed discussion of how the framework could be used to develop and assess stream restoration projects. Click here for more information.

3) Success Spotlight: Magees Creek, Mississippi -- Implementing Agricultural Best Management Practices Reduces Fecal Coliform Bacteria in Magees Creek
EPA's Clean Water Act Section 319 Program provides funding for restoration of nonpoint source-impaired water bodies. This week's success spotlight shines on Magees Creek, Mississippi. The Magees Creek watershed covers approximately 143,000 acres in southern Mississippi. Elevated levels of fecal coliform bacteria from agricultural runoff, wildlife and other sources had exceeded Mississippi's Magees Creek pathogen water quality standards for its recreational designated use. As a result, the state added Magees Creek to its 1998 list of impaired waters for pathogens. With the support of nonpoint source grant funding and matching funds from partner agencies, the state and its project partners implemented agricultural best management practices on more than 3,355 acres in the watershed, that include planting pasture and hayland, planting trees, and installing fencing between livestock and the creek. Water quality has improved and Mississippi has removed portions of Magees Creek from the state's list of impaired waters in 2012. Click here for more information.

4) Clean Water Act 40th Anniversary Video Project: Ongoing
Be a part of EPA's Clean Water Act 40th Anniversary video project: Tell us why "Water is Worth It" to you. As a part of EPA's Clean Water Act 40th Anniversary celebration, the Agency is hosting a video project asking Americans to send in a 15-second video clip explaining the important role that water plays in their lives. EPA will feature selected video clips on its website and "Water Is Worth It" Facebook page as part of its anniversary celebration. Video submissions are being accepted until September 14, 2012. Click here for more information.

 


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