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Water: Water Headlines

May 21, 2012

1) EPA Launches Competition for College Students to Develop Innovative Approaches to Stormwater Management
2) Success Spotlight: Clearwater River, Minnesota -- Managing Agricultural Drainage Reduces Bacteria in River


1) EPA Launches Competition for College Students to Develop Innovative Approaches to Stormwater Management
EPA has launched a new design competition called the Campus RainWorks Challenge to encourage student teams on college and university campuses across the country to develop innovative approaches to stormwater management. The competition will help raise awareness of green design and planning approaches at colleges and universities, and train the next generation of landscape architects, planners and engineers in green infrastructure principles and design.

The Campus RainWorks Challenge will help encourage the use of green infrastructure projects on college and university campuses to manage stormwater runoff. Registration for the Campus RainWorks Challenge opens September 4, and entries must be submitted by December 14, 2012 for consideration. Winning teams will earn a cash prize of $1,500 - $2,500, as well as $8,000 - $11,000 in funds for their faculty advisor to conduct research on green infrastructure.

More information on the Campus RainWorks Challenge: http://water.epa.gov/infrastructure/greeninfrastructure/crw_challenge.cfm

2) Success Spotlight: Clearwater River, Minnesota -- Managing Agricultural Drainage Reduces Bacteria in River
EPA's Clean Water Act Section 319 Program provides funding for restoration of nonpoint source-impaired water bodies. Success stories are posted at: http://water.epa.gov/polwaste/nps/success319/. This week's success spotlight shines on Clearwater River, Minnesota.

Northwestern Minnesota's Clearwater River is in the Red Lake River basin where agriculture, forest and wetlands are major land uses of the watershed. Activities such as livestock operations, wildlife and drainage from wild rice paddies, contributed high levels of bacteria that violated water quality standards. As a result, the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency added a 58 mile segment of the Clearwater River to the state's list of impaired waters in 2002 for excessive levels of pathogens. Project partners took a number of restoration measures, including planting buffer strips, stabilizing streambanks and improving the drainage of wild rice paddies. These efforts have reduced bacteria levels, and as a result, the agency removed the 58 mile segment of Clearwater River from the state's 2010 list of impaired waters for bacteria.

For more information on this story, visit: http://water.epa.gov/polwaste/nps/success319/mn_clearwater.cfm

 


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