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Water: Water Headlines

October 23, 2012

1) New App Lets Users Check Health of Waterways Anywhere in the U.S.
2) Blog Spotlight: Celebrate the 40th Anniversary of the Clean Water Act
3) Success Spotlight: Stone Bridge Brook, Vermont


1) New App Lets Users Check Health of Waterways Anywhere in the U.S.
EPA has launched a new app and website to help people find information on the condition of thousands of lakes, rivers and streams across the United States from their smart phone, tablet or desktop computer. Available at http://www.epa.gov/mywaterway, the How's My Waterway app and website uses GPS technology or a user-entered zip code or city name to provide information about the quality of local water bodies. The release of the app and website helps mark the 40th anniversary of the Clean Water Act, which Congress enacted on October 18, 1972, giving citizens a special role in caring for the nation's water resources. Forty years later, EPA is providing citizens with a technology-based tool to expand that stewardship. Click here for the press release. Click here to read a blog from EPA scientist Doug Norton.

2) Blog Spotlight: Celebrate the 40th Anniversary of the Clean Water Act
Nancy Stoner, acting Assistant Administrator for EPA's Office of Water, has blogged about the 40th anniversary of the Clean Water Act. In the blog, Ms. Stoner reflects on the successes and the challenges that remain acknowledging the role of partnerships to continue making progress for clean water. Click here to read the blog. 

3) Success Spotlight: Stone Bridge Brook, Vermont
EPA's Clean Water Act Section 319 Program provides funding for restoration of nonpoint source-impaired water bodies. This week's success spotlight shines on Stone Bridge Brook, Vermont. Agricultural activities in the watershed increased nutrient and sediment runoff impairing a 2-mile portion of the stream for aquatic life. Agricultural best management practices, such as planting of more than 300 acres of winter cover crops and use of no-till planting to reduce erosion, led to improvement in water quality, prompting the Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation to remove it from the state's list of impaired waters in 2012. Click here for more information. 

 


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