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Water: Water Headlines

October 2, 2012

1) EPA Releases Interactive Map of Results from National Estuary Program Projects
2) EPA Releases New 2012 Guidelines for Water Reuse
3) Webinar on Hiring and Training Veterans: A Resource for the Water Sector
4) Success Spotlight: Richland Creek, North Carolina


1) EPA Releases Interactive Map of Results from National Estuary Program Projects
EPA's National Estuary Program (NEP), a place-based program to protect and restore the water quality and ecological integrity of estuaries of national significance, has released a first-ever interactive map, NEPmap, with more than a decade's worth of NEP habitat data. A simple static map with contained descriptions of NEP habitat protection and yearly restoration projects, has been replaced with a large set of data layers to enable viewing of NEP habitat information in a wider environmental context. The NEPmap allows users to view water quality conditions in their estuary and surrounding watershed alongside NEP habitat projects. NEPmap users can also generate and print maps and reports, change map scales, turn on and off background layers and interact with information points to provide a greater level of detail than a traditional static map. Click here for more information.

2) EPA Releases New 2012 Guidelines for Water Reuse
Water reclamation and reuse have taken on increasing importance in the water supply of communities in the U.S. and around the world to achieve efficient resource use, ensure protection of environmental and human health, and improve water management. EPA has released the Agency's 2012 guidelines for water reuse. The 2012 reuse guidelines update and build on the Agency's previous reuse guidelines issued in 2004, incorporating information on water reuse that has been developed since the 2004 document was issued. In addition to summarizing U.S. existing regulations, the document includes water reuse practices outside of the U.S., case studies, information on planning for future water reuse systems, and information on indirect potable reuse and industrial reuse. Disinfection and treatment technologies, emerging contaminants, and public involvement and acceptance are also discussed. Click here for more information and to view a copy of the document.

3) Webinar on Hiring and Training Veterans: A Resource for the Water Sector
On October 30, from 1:00 - 2:30 p.m. ET, EPA will host a webinar for water sector professionals, utility managers, and human resources staff to learn how to access the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) programs to hire and train veterans for careers at water and wastewater utilities. The VA staff, in Washington, D.C., will outline the benefits of hiring veterans and provide information on working with local VA employment coordinators to find qualified candidates. The webinar is being co-sponsored by the American Water Works Association and the Water Environment Federation and is part of a May 2012 memorandum of understanding (MOU) between EPA and the VA Vocational Rehabilitation Employment Services to help connect veterans with disabilities to career opportunities in the water sector. For more information, contact Allison Watanabe at (202) 564-0128 or watanabe.allison@epa.gov. Click here for information on the EPA/VA MOU and here to register for the free webinar.

4) Success Spotlight: Richland Creek, North Carolina
EPA's Clean Water Act Section 319 Program provides funding for restoration of nonpoint source-impaired water bodies. This week's success spotlight shines on Richland Creek, North Carolina. Richland Creek serves as the municipal water supply for the town of Waynesville and flows into Lake Junaluska, a 200-acre reservoir that is also a popular recreational destination. Increased fecal coliform bacteria and sedimentation, primarily from livestock and septic straight pipes, led the North Carolina Division of Water Quality to add 15-plus miles of Richland Creek to the state's list of impaired waters in 2002 for not meeting its designated use to support aquatic life. Using approximately $2 million in state and federal funding, watershed partners implemented agricultural best management practices, such as check dams and vegetative cover to reduce erosion, fencing for livestock, and wastewater treatment repairs. In 2010, the state removed a portion of Richland Creek from its list of impaired waters. Click here for more information.

 


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