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Water: Water Headlines

September 12, 2011

1) Register for an EPA Watershed Academy Webcast on "State and Local Policies to Restrict the Use of Lawn Fertilizers" on September 21, 2011
2) International Coastal Cleanup on September 17th


1) Register for an EPA Watershed Academy Webcast on "State and Local Policies to Restrict the Use of Lawn Fertilizers" on September 21, 2011
Join the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for a free Watershed Academy webcast titled "Nitrogen and Phosphorus Pollution Series: State and Local Policies to Restrict the Use of Lawn Fertilizers" on Wednesday, September 21, 2011 at 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM Eastern. Fertilizers, leaves, grass clippings, animal waste, and eroded soil are all sources of phosphorus and nitrogen. When they are swept or washed into the street or nearest storm drain, they end up in your local lake or river where they can cause algal blooms and other water quality problems. This webcast will highlight legislation passed by Minnesota, Michigan and the Chesapeake Bay states to restrict the use of lawn fertilizers, and will share key lessons learned. This webcast is one in a series on the important issue of nutrient pollution.

Participants are encouraged to download presentations prior to the webcast. To download webcast presentations and to register for this Webcast, please visit www.epa.gov/watershedwebcasts. Webcast participants are eligible to receive a certificate for their attendance.

2) International Coastal Cleanup on September 17th
The Ocean Conservancy, with help from EPA and other sponsors, will host the 26th International Coastal Cleanup (ICC) on Saturday, September 17, 2011. The ICC is an annual event that includes over 100 countries and territories bordering every major body of water on Earth. Each year nearly half a million volunteers around the world spend a few hours removing trash and debris from beaches, lakes, rivers, and other waterways making it the world's largest volunteer effort to clean up the marine environment and collect environmental data from both land and sea.

Marine debris, trash, and other solid material that enters ocean and coastal waters, is a major pollution problem affecting every waterway, with impacts experienced locally, nationally, and internationally. The trash that accumulates can impact human health, local economies, and ecosystems. EPA has been one of the lead federal agencies working on the issue of marine debris for over 25 years. Visit the Ocean Conservancy's International Coastal Cleanup website at http://www.oceanconservancy.org/site/PageServer?pagename=icc_home to search for a cleanup site near you.

For information about marine debris: http://water.epa.gov/type/oceb/marinedebris/index.cfm

 


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